Live Reactions in Quizizz

If you want to get your students logged into a Quizizz game or test faster, Live Reactions may be the perfect way to do it. 

Once students are in, they can click on the little reaction stickers and they’ll pop up on your board or projector. It’s just a fun little thing to make students smile and get them logged in more quickly. 

Live Reactions are also available AFTER the quiz, so students can react to their performance or who won or whatever. Also, the reactions are totaled at the top of the screen, so you could potentially use it as a way for students to vote or give feedback on the game. This could be a distraction if you’re going over commonly missed questions, so you may need to set ground rules with your students on this one or just turn this feature off when starting an activity.

Reactions are available to all Quizizz users.

[ Image(s) Source: twitter.com/quizizz/status/1574458702417076225 ]

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The Gift Power-Up in Quizizz

Quizizz recently added a new power-up to their live classic game mode.

While the existing powerups give kids ways to earn more points, this new one is intended to increase learner-to-learner interaction and ramp up the fun. It’s similar to features that students love in other games like Gimkit and Blooket, so it’s a good move for Quizizz to make. The Power-Up is called Gift and it gives your learners the chance to send another player an extra 800 points. Will they send it to their best friend? Or the person in last place so they don’t have to risk losing because of that power-up? Strategy!

  • A reminder, by the way, that students’ accuracy scores are not affected by Power-ups, just their score in the competition itself. So, they add to the fun without taking away from the relevance of this tool as evidence of learning.
  • The Gift Powerup available to all Quizizz users.

[ Image(s) Source: support.quizizz.com/hc/en-us/articles/360035742872-Power-ups-their-Types ]

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Import and Edit Google Slides in Quizizz

Quizizz has made a ton of updates in the last few months—Time for us to catch up on them!

First up, if you’ve done lessons in Quizizz, you know that you can import Google Slides into your lesson. They typically come in as a static, uneditable image of that slide. They’re now rolling out the ability to edit those slides in Quizizz. So, it breaks the slide apart into separate elements that can then be edited.

This is not perfect because some images and fonts come in a little wonky – think about what happens when you bring a Word Document into Google Docs or a Google Slides into Powerpoint – yah, same kind of situation. So, you might find that your slides don’t look quite right or that you can’t edit what you want. For example, this was a minor one, but I kept finding that it inserted a big white rectangle for the background from my slide.

That’s no big deal, but if you have a complex slide with crazy fonts, you may have more issues. If you know that your slides are perfect and you want to avoid anything getting messed up, choose the Uneditable Slides option, and they’ll come in as static images just like they used to. But, if you want to edit them within Quizizz, choose the editable option.

This, by the way, is available on all accounts.

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Quizizz Updates

OK, so Quizizz has made a ton of updates in the last few months. Time for us to catch up on them!
  • First up, they’ve got two new question types rolling out to paid users: dropdown and drag-and-drop. Both are nice because they can be within a passage of text. So any time that you’d add a blank into a passage for them to fill in like cloze reading activities, for example, you can use dropdown or drag-and-drop there. And, speaking of adding a blank, that’s actually how you do it. When you get to the spot that you want a blank, just put two underscores and a rectangle will pop up. Type in the correct answer, then hit enter and you’ll see it highlighted in white AND added to the options below.  You can then add additional detractor options, if you want to.

On the student end, it’s pretty straight-forward how it works. The only tricky thing is what to do if they initially drag a drag-and-drop option to the wrong spot.  They can’t drag it to a new spot – instead, they click the red X and then drag it to the correct spot. In both of these options, you can have multiple spots to answer… so I wondered, how will it grade it? So, first, in a game the kids get some points, but less than the full amount, if they got some of the answers correct and others incorrect.  And this is great – they’re rewarded, but not as much as a kid who got it completely correct. In the summary views, both on the teacher and student screen, it shows them as either correct or incorrect, not partially correct.  And, it seems like it shows up one way in one screen and the other way in the other, which is weird. However, in the reports that you can access, which is the most important to me, it’ll break the kids’ score down. It gives them the proportional amount of the points that the question was worth. Which is a good time to remind you – you can modify the number of points a question is worth. They default to 5 points apiece, but if you have a question with 3 blanks, you might want to make it worth 3 points… or a multiple of 3… or maybe even 15 to treat it as 3 5-point questions. I’m excited to see these options available. Again, they’re for paid users only. You may not see them in your account just yet, but they should appear soon.

 

  • This one seems little, but I know it’s one that I’ve wished for before – if you start up a homework assignment and discover that you had a mistake, like a question that had the wrong correct answer selected, you can go back in and make that change without deleting the assignment and recreating it. Previously, all of your students would have that answer marked incorrectly and you’d have to explain the mixup to them later… but now you can make the fix right away, hopefully before most of your students have encountered it. This is available on Quizizz paid plans.

 

  • Students can now also skip questions and come back to them later.  When they click the Skip button, that question is moved to the end of the quiz. Then, after they’ve attempted all the other questions, they’ll return to the one that they skipped. Note that when they return to the skipped questions, they won’t have the option to skip them again.  This feature is part of the paid plans.

 

  • If you’re using Quizizz to assess your students’ understanding on a topic, you’re going to want to make sure that they’re not looking up answers in other tabs. If you’re on a Quizizz School or District Plan, you can now use Focus Mode within Live Tests to do this.  Focus mode will open the Quizizz activity in full screen and warn your student if they try to exit full screen. Also, you’ll be notified if they switch tabs while in the quiz.
    • There are multiple notifications that you’ll receive as the teacher. Those notifications will come up if the student leaves the quiz, if they spend 2 minutes outside of the quiz, if they join the quiz 2 minutes late, if they exit before completing the quiz, and, finally, if they rejoin the quiz after 2 minutes in outside of it.
    • Students who switched tabs during Focus Mode will have the ‘Off-task activity’ tag under their name. However, this tag does not affect their scores.
    • Note: you can only do this in live test mode, not in classic, team, or homework modes. And, as I said before, this is for teachers in School or District Plans. It does not work for educators, like me, who are in Super Plans or, obviously, the free plans.
OK – I’ve got 3 or 4 more Quizizz things to share with you, but I’m going to save them for another blog post, so stay tuned!

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16+ Formative Assessment Tools for #RemoteLearning!

Title Image for Post. Reads: 16+ Formative Assessment Tools for #RemoteLearning and includes the URL for the post.Wow. March 2020 has been quite a month. And buckle up, folks, because it looks like April is going to be more of the same.

For many educators, that means screencasts of lessons, assignments in learning management systems, and lots of time on Zoom or Google Meet.

But what about Formative Assessment? If we’re going to teach new content during these extended school closures caused by the coronavirus and COVID-19 (I’m not sure if we should, but that’s another post) then we need to know if students are comprehending that new content!

So, I put that question out to the Duct Tapers (listeners to my podcast, the Educational Duct Tape Podcast). I got a handful of answers, which I featured in Episode 39b of the podcast.

A week later, I reached out for even more ideas! On Wednesday 3.25.2020, I hosted a #EduDuctTape Twitter chat focused on this and 2 other #RemoteLearning concepts. So, based on the thoughts shared in the episode and the ideas shared in the Twitter chat, I’ve got a BUNCH to share with you! So let’s dig into it! Continue reading 16+ Formative Assessment Tools for #RemoteLearning!

Spice Up Remote Learning Formative Assessments with Customized Quizizz Memes!

If awesome features of Quizizz was a topic on Family Feud, I’m pretty confident that the memes would make it up onto the board.

But I’m definitely confident that your students would love it if they were working on a Quizizz set as part of their #RemoteLearning (or whatever you prefer to call it) and were surprised with the sight of their teacher in the memes. Their teacher! The same teacher that they’ve been missing for the last few weeks since they were last at school.  The very same teacher that they’re bummed to not get to see any time in April (and possibly longer). Whether they admit it or not, it’s a little extra touch that your students would really get a kick out of.

So, when Allison Curry suggested it in Episode 39B of the Educational Duct Tape Podcast, I fell in love with the idea. But the best part of this idea is how easy it is to pull this off! Check it out in the #EduGIF below (and the step-by-step instructions under the GIF).

This animated GIF shows the process for adding teacher-created memes in Quizizz.
A Pausable version of this #EduGIF is available at youtube.com/watch?v=DfJTiE4Zyec

 

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