AutoPlay & Loop in Google Slides

Need slides running on loop during an Open House or other event?  Here’s how to do it!

It’s super simple!

  1. File > Publish to the Web
  2. Link (not embed)
  3. Select the amount of time between slides (unfortunately, all slides have to be same length.  Need some slides to show for longer? Duplicate them so that they show twice.)
  4. Decide if you want it to start playing as soon as you open it.
  5. Decide if you want it to loop (restart).
  6. Access the link.  Hit the full screen button. That’s it!

Note: If you’d like it to be a slideshow of pictures that are in your drive, I recommend the Drive Slides extension (by Matt Miller & Alice Keeler) for getting those images quickly into a slideshow.  It’s limited to 50 images/slides, but you could always make separate slideshows and then import the slides from one into the other.

AutoPlay & Loop Google Slides Animation

Note: if this is for a permanent hallway display or sign, you should try out Chrome Sign Builder.

You can also select embed to easily embed the auto-playing, auto-looping slides into a non-Google Sites webpage, like this:

Continue reading AutoPlay & Loop in Google Slides

Update the Master Slide in Google Slides

One function in Google Slides that most people don’t notice is there is “Edit Master.”  This option is great for adding branding to your slides and much more.  Here are some of the things that you can do in there, followed by a GIF of how to do it:

  • Change the font style for all of your slides
  • Add a logo or watermark
  • Change background colors
  • Make all slides match the theme of a lesson or presentation
  • Change the layout (find that you’re always moving the title up to give more space to type? Do it here)
  • Add new slide layouts (need a 3-column layout?)
  • Change layout of all of your slides at once
  • Lock objects in place (the pictures become part of the background!) for activities with students
  • Create layouts for certain uses (i.e., Yearbooks, eBooks, etc.)

Edit Slides Master Animation

Embedding Slides in “New” Google Sites

When I recommend Google Sites to people, it’s typically because it’s so easy to embed so many of the things that we regularly use.  Google Slides is no exception.  Here are a few notes about it, followed by a GIF animation of how to do it.

  • Be sure that the Google Slides file has sharing settings that will allow the appropriate people to see it on the site. If your file is private and someone goes to your site, they’ll see a blank box where the slides should be.
  • You can set the slides to auto-play when the site loads!
  • With auto-play on, you can set the slides to auto-loop and modify the amount of time that each slide plays for.
  • You can change the size and position of the embedded Google Slides presentation.

Embed Slides in New Google Sites Animation

Inserting a Timer in Google Slides

One thing that helps a lesson or presentation run smoothly is good time management with a visual timer.  It’s a lacking tool in Google Slides.  But, of course, there’s a hack for that!

Click Insert > Video and search for a YouTube video titled “x minute timer” with the appropriate x value filled in.  Just about every time limit a teacher or presenter could ask for in available!

Timer in Google Slides Animation

Choose Your Own Adventure Google Slides

This isn’t my idea, but it’s one that I love, so I wanted to make one of my GIFs about it.  I think that I first heard the idea from Eric Curts (@ericcurts).

Anyhow, Choose Your Own Adventure stories are a favorite from my childhood and if we can leverage them to help students be more active and engaged in the way that they show their knowledge of content, writing abilities or creativity – I’m in!

Here’s how to do it, first as a GIF, followed by step-by-step instructions.  And remember, Eric’s post linked above is a great resource as well.

Choose Your Own Adventure Google Slides Animation

  1. Create your starting slide.
  2. In two separate text boxes (or with two separate pictures or with two separate words/phrases within a text box) provide options for the next step.
  3. Create 2 new slides – these are the possible next steps.
  4. Back on the starting slide, click on one of the text boxes, images or text within a text box.
  5. Use the hyperlink button (or Ctrl+k) to link to the appropriate slide.
  6. Repeat the process for the other option.
  7. Now . . . add steps that branch off of those 2 options . . .

If you or your students make a really phenomenal Choose Your Own Adventure Slides project, I’d love to see it!

 

Emoji in Google Docs

They’re on your phone.  They’re in a movie.  They’re on clothes.  They’re on social media.  They’re probably tattooed on people.  And yes . . . they’re in Google Docs.

Here’s how to enter Emoji (and other symbols) in Google Docs, Slides or Drawings. Once you click Insert > Special Characters you have 3 options:

  1. Change the dropdown that initially says “Symbol” to say “Emoji” and navigate to the Emoji that you want.
  2. Search by keyword.
  3. Search by drawing the Emoji.

Tip: The emojis are text items, not pictures.  That means that their size is dependent on your selected font size.

Emoji in Docs Animation

Moving Stuff Out of your “Shared with Me”

Every household has a junk drawer.  And, for most Google Drive users, they have two: My Drive and Shared with Me.  Everything is in there.  Today, let’s focus on how to clean up your Shared with Me.

Here are 4 tips about cleaning up your Shared with Me, followed by a GIF displaying them:

  1. If there are files you are 100% sure that don’t want, go ahead and delete them.  You’ll still technically have access to them, but you won’t see them in your Shared with Me anymore (so good luck finding them).  The original sharer will have no idea that you removed them and it won’t affect them (because you’re not the owner).
  2. You can click Add to Drive to move files from your Shared with Me to your own Drive, where you can then organize it.
  3. You can drag & drop files from the Shared with Me to anywhere in your Drive to organize them.
  4. Once you’ve moved files into your Drive, you can delete them from your Shared with Me and they will stay in the location that you put them.

Move from Shared With Me Animation

Google Slides Flash Cards

There are plenty of flash cards sites, apps and ideas out there.  And many of them are great.  But… it’s nice to not have to add another tool to your classroom, another site to your list of resources, another password for your students to remember and possibly another account for your students to access.

So, if you don’t need a fully-featured flash cards solution, stick with what you’ve got (and know): Google Slides.

  • Students can work together to create the cards.
  • You can assign each kid a card to make . . . and 5 minutes later you have a whole deck.
  • Cards can involve pictures from a Google image search, pictures from students’ Drive or webcams, drawings and videos.
  • You can project it in class to have a class-wide review.
  • Students can use it to study from their cell phones and other devices.
  • If you have a class website, you can embed the Slides on the site.
  • Students can make a copy of the Slides to make them their own, add information that helps them, delete cards they already know and add cards for terms they struggle with.

Google Slides Flash Cards Animation

*Disclaimer: I’m really not a flash cards, vocabulary kind of guy.  Knowing the lingo has some value, but in general… memorization of stuff that fits on a flash card is just that: memorization.  Since I know that it’s an important part of a lot of classrooms, I want to share this strategy for doing it, but I hope that you do it along with other types of learning experiences, like Project-Based Learning and other inquiry-based strategies.

Force Make a Copy

Thou shalt make a copy. – Jake Miller

Ok, so, I never said that.  Well, actually, I guess I just did.  Anyhow, it’s a trick that’s known in most edtech circles, but it’s useful enough to make sure that everyone knows it:

Change the “/edit” or “/view” (or whatever) at the end of a Google Apps file’s URL to “/copy” and it will force the person clicking the link to make a copy of it (as if they had clicked File > Make a Copy).

Important: make sure the doc is shared, at least as “Can View,” prior to using this.  You can’t copy a doc that you can’t view!

With the rise of Google Classroom and other LMS options, it’s not as useful as it used to be, but it has its use cases: sharing a resource on your website, posting forms for use in your school district, sharing optional activities for classes or clubs and much more.  It works in Drawings, Sheets and Slides as well! Here’s how to do it:

Force Make a Copy Animation

Just in case, here are those steps:

  1. Share the doc as “Anyone with the Link Can View.”
  2. Copy the link to the doc.
  3. Change the “/edit” or “/view” or “/edit?usp=sharing” to “/copy

Adding Audio in Google Slides (Hack)

Listen, I get it – when you’re showing your students the chambers of the heart, you want to have “Total Eclipse of the Heart” playing.  And, when you teach your class about the food chain, you need “Hungry Like the Wolf” rocking out of your speakers.  But, guess who doesn’t get it?  Google.  No audio in Google Slides.  Sorry, no music for you.

But!  I’ve got your back.  When you present about the states of water, you need to be playing this, or maybe this.  I didn’t invent this hack, but I created a GIF to showcase it for you.

Step by step instructions are below the GIF.

Adding Audio in Google Slides Animation

  1. Insert > Video
  2. Search for & Insert the video for the song you want from YouTube
  3. Right Click, Video Options
  4. Select “Autoplay when presenting”
  5. If desired, set a specific start time
  6. Make the video tiny
  7. Rock out when in presentation mode
  8. Keep in mind – your song will stop when you move on to the next slide, so plan accordingly

Note – this is a copyright gray area (or worse), for sure. I always try to use Vevo videos, because we at least we know that those were uploaded by the companies that own the rights to those music videos.