Google Classroom “Practice Sets”

Google is beta testing a formative assessment tool…

Illustration of students using Google Classroom's Practice Sets

Back in March Google announced a new Google Classroom feature called Practice Sets. Before I get too deep into this one, I want to point out: it’ll only be in the Teaching and Learning Upgrade or the Google Workspace for Education Plus (i.e. part of the paid plans).  It’s still in beta at this point, but I think it’s something that, if you have access to it, you’ll probably use. It’s a tool that combines formative assessment and automated feedback right inside Google Classroom

The teacher starts by adding (or typing up) a question, or set of questions. Practice Sets jumps right into gear by scanning the question using AI, tagging the content and skill, and preparing automated chatbot style hints and resources. I’m skeptical of this part – I mean, haven’t we all had that chatbot pop up on a site that we really needed help from and suggest irrelevant resources to us when we just wanted to talk to a human? We’ll see what we think of this!

Anyhow, it looks like it’ll have multiple choice, short answer, and extended response and will provide a math keyboard as well. Plus, students can respond with text or a drawing tool and, check this out math teachers, if the kids show their work, you’ll be able to see that too.

Most importantly, this tool auto-grades for you right inside Google Classroom, and your students will see if they were correct right away. Those built in hints and resources will pop up automatically if they’re wrong—or kids can click a button to see them if they need them.

On the back end, teachers get good data, a view of what students did, and automated insights. Again, it’s still in beta and it’s part of the paid plans, but it looks like it’s going to have lots of potential when it comes out! 

[Image Source: https://blog.google/outreach-initiatives/education/introducing-practice-sets/]

Continue reading Google Classroom “Practice Sets”

Record your screen anywhere, with Chrome Extension ScreenPal

There’s a new free tool for video comments and video emails…

Screencast-o-matic recently announced a new Chrome Extension called ScreenPal, and it may just be a perfect addition to your edtech toolbox!

It is FREE, it lets you record your screen or webcam (or both) for up to 5 minutes, and it lets you do it from just about anywhere on the web.

You might be thinking, Jake, that sounds kinda like regular Screencast-o-matic or, for that matter, Screencastify or Loom. What’s different, though, is that it’s built to work in comment boxes and text boxes. 

ScreenPal Chrome Extension allows cropping of recordings and inserting screen recordings into comment and text boxes as an Edtech tool.In those boxes, you’ll see a tiny ScreenPal button—Grammarly users will be reminded of the Grammarly button. Anyhow, you click the button, select screen, webcam, or both, and then press record. You then preview the video to trim or crop it, and finally, insert that recording into the text box or comment box you were in.

I can’t believe that you can actually crop the video in this simple little tool!

Want to give a student feedback? Click the extension and pop it right into the comment box in Google Docs, Google Classroom, Microsoft Teams, or whatever LMS you use. Now, it won’t work IN your Google Doc or Google Slides, for example, but it’ll work in the comments within those platforms. It also works in tweets within your email window so that you can explain with video (when you don’t feel like typing). You can access all of your recordings, too, which means you can reuse them later if needed! 

The only issue I see (so far) is that if you have both Mote and ScreenPal running, the buttons are on top of each other in some platforms—I’m going to send them that feedback.

Otherwise, this looks like a great tool.

And, elephant in the room, this tool is really similar to Mote – the major difference, of course, is audio vs. video. But, as I always say, there’s not one right tool for every person, or every situation. This one is definitely worth checking out.

BTW, if you have Screencast-o-matic Premium you’ll also be able to edit those ScreenPal videos later within the Screencast-o-matic site. I should note – since the videos are stored on their server, you’ll want to look into how that fits with your privacy and data regulations in your school.

[Image Source: https://screencast-o-matic.com/screenpal]

Continue reading Record your screen anywhere, with Chrome Extension ScreenPal

Scheduling for Multiple Classes in Google Classroom

Google has rolled out a long-awaited Google Classroom feature . . . 

On St. Patrick’s Day (better known as my birthday), Google for Education announced on the Google Workspace Updates page that, after a long wait, the ability to schedule stream posts, assignments, and materials for multiple classes in Google Classroom was available

It’s even better than I could have imagined because it also lets you select different due dates and different topics for your assignments!

I also really like the “Copy settings to all” option which lets you set it up for the first class, then copy those settings to all of the classes, then make changes. 

Let’s go over an example:

Say I want the assignment to launch simultaneously for all classes, but have different due times based on when I have that class period. Or maybe I just want to put them all in the same topic within the classes first, copy that, then modify the post times. I also like that I can select “post now” for some classes, but schedule for others.

Tutorial example in Google Classroom of scheduling posts for multiple classes.

I’m really happy with how this came out! Assignment and post scheduling is available in Google Workspace for Education Fundamentals, Education Standard, the Teaching and Learning Upgrade, and Education Plus customers (it can also be seen in my gmail account.)

Continue reading Scheduling for Multiple Classes in Google Classroom

Create Google Jamboard Backgrounds in Google Slides

Google Jamboard is a good tool for collaborative activities in the classroom or virtual learning environment, but it’s missing some features that could make it an amazing tool. Among those absent features is the ability to design your frames (the “slides” in a “Jam”) in ways that you might design a Google Slide.

Well, don’t let that stop you! You can create your backgrounds and templates in Google Slides and then turn them into Jamboard backgrounds!

And, here’s a little bonus: You could have one Slides file with all of your Jamboard backgrounds and templates in it! Oooh – organized!

Check out the process – and a bonus tip for a quicker way to upload the image –  in the #EduGIF below and then, under the animation, check out some step-by-step instructions! You can also view a video, with explanations here.

This animation shows the process of creating a Google Jamboard background in Google Slides. The steps are written out below the animation.
Check out a Pausable version of this #EduGIF here or a video version with an explanation here.

Continue reading Create Google Jamboard Backgrounds in Google Slides

Easily Add Audio in Google Slides with mote!

This is NOT a sponsored post. However, when it was initially posted, mote did provide me with access to an Unlimited account to try it out + is gave away FREE 1-year Unlimited licenses to 5 of my readers! (those prizes have already been given out) All opinions in the post, however, are my own.

🗣️ U!
🗣️ D!
🗣️ L!

UDL, or Universal Design for Learning, is the practice of making your students’ learning experiences–the content delivery, the demonstrations of learning, all of it–universally accessible.

And that means that we need to deliver content in as many modalities as possible. This is why I was super excited when Google unveiled the ability to add audio in Google Slides. However, my excitement was dampened by the lack of a straightforward process to adding said audio.

Record the audio here, save it there, upload it here, then add it to your Slides.

Can’t we just record the audio in Slides and have it appear in Slides? Please!?

Well, the team at mote has our back on this. Their awesome Chrome extension has been rocking feedback and other classroom processes with the superpower of adding audio comments in Google Classroom, Google Docs, and more. Then they let us use mote while we were surfing the web in Chrome. But now they’ve really outdone themselves . . .

👉 Use the extension to record while you’re in Google Slides and it pops it right onto your Slide. 🤯

Check it out in the #EduGIF below and then, at the bottom, enter to win one of 5 FREE Unlimited mote licenses!

This animated GIF shows the process of using the mote Chrome Extension to add audio to Google Slides!

Isn’t that awesome? So slick, so easy, and so good for tons of different learning scenarios.

While the super generous free version gives you these capabilities with audio recordings of up to 30 seconds in length, some of you Chatty Cathys and Talkative Tommys may need a few more ticks of the Apple Watch. That’s where the Essential and Unlimited plans and their 90 second-limit come in. You can learn more about the plans here.

#EduDuctTape Episode 42: Sarah Thomas, PhD!

Image shows a picture of Dr. Sarah Thomas and the text "Dr. Sarah Thomas on the Educational Duct Tape Podcast, #EduDuctTape, EduDuctTape.com, Episode 042, 6-3-20

In the 20th regular episode of Season 2, I am joined by Dr. Sarah Thomas, ISTE co-author and founder of EduMatch, to talk about growing your professional learning network (PLN), crowd-sourcing solutions to problems, and using tools like Voxer, Periscope, Twitter, Skype, and Flipgrid.

See the Show Notes Here

Link to this Episode on YouTube!
Listen on YouTube!

 

 

 

Check out this awesome quote from Sarah’s appearance on the show!

Continue reading #EduDuctTape Episode 42: Sarah Thomas, PhD!

Filtering by Color in Google Sheets

Sometimes when I’m working on a project in Google Sheets, I shade cells a certain color to visually organize them. I’ve always wished that there was a way to just see the green ones.  Or the red ones.  Or the yellow ones.  Sure, I could add some kind of indicator in a separate cell that I can filter by, but I wished that I could just do it by color.

Well, now I can! Recently, Google added the ability to filter and sort based on the cell color and the font color. Check out how it works with filtering in the EduGIF below! The step-by-step instructions are underneath the EduGIF.

This animated GIF shows the process by which cells in Google Sheets can be filtered by color. Step-by-step instructions are included in the blog post.
See the pausable version of this EduGIF here.

Before I share the step-by-step instructions, one last note. In the EduGIF, I did not share the process of sorting by color. When sorting by color, you’re selecting the color group (red, green, or white, in my GIF) that will come first. The other colors are then grouped after that. Within the color groups, the values will also be sorted in the default format (largest number to smallest number, in my data set). Continue reading Filtering by Color in Google Sheets

#EduDuctTape Episode 41: Catlin Tucker!

Image Shows the episode title & a picture of the guest, Catlin Tucker

In the 19th regular episode of Season 2, I am sharing an episode with Catlin Tucker, author of Balance With Blended Learning, where we talk about how teachers can streamline feedback during class time so that they have less to do outside of class time. Catlin shares strategies from John Hattie and Mark Barnes as well as a handful of great tech tips to make feedback more efficient!

See the Show Notes Here

Link to this Episode on YouTube!
Listen on YouTube!

 

 

 

Check out some of Catlin’s mic-drop quotes from the episode below…

Continue reading #EduDuctTape Episode 41: Catlin Tucker!

#EduDuctTape Episode 40: Supporting Students with Special Needs in Remote Learning!

Graphic shows the 8 guests from this show along with their names and the title of the episode.

In the 18th full episode of Season 2, I share tips, ideas, and recommendations from multiple educators about supporting students with special needs during remote learning. We discuss different accessibility features and assistive technologies within Chromebooks, iPads, Google Chrome, Microsoft and more, as well as some best practices, accommodations, and modifications.

Thanks to my friends who shared: David Allan, Catherine Day, Hillary Goldthwait-Fowles, Angela Greene, Lauren Hawkins, Pam Hubler, Matt Meyer, Jennifer Pearson

See the Show Notes Here

Link to this Episode on YouTube!
Listen on YouTube!

 

 

 

Check out these quotable moments from this episode . . . 

Continue reading #EduDuctTape Episode 40: Supporting Students with Special Needs in Remote Learning!

16+ Formative Assessment Tools for #RemoteLearning!

Title Image for Post. Reads: 16+ Formative Assessment Tools for #RemoteLearning and includes the URL for the post.Wow. March 2020 has been quite a month. And buckle up, folks, because it looks like April is going to be more of the same.

For many educators, that means screencasts of lessons, assignments in learning management systems, and lots of time on Zoom or Google Meet.

But what about Formative Assessment? If we’re going to teach new content during these extended school closures caused by the coronavirus and COVID-19 (I’m not sure if we should, but that’s another post) then we need to know if students are comprehending that new content!

So, I put that question out to the Duct Tapers (listeners to my podcast, the Educational Duct Tape Podcast). I got a handful of answers, which I featured in Episode 39b of the podcast.

A week later, I reached out for even more ideas! On Wednesday 3.25.2020, I hosted a #EduDuctTape Twitter chat focused on this and 2 other #RemoteLearning concepts. So, based on the thoughts shared in the episode and the ideas shared in the Twitter chat, I’ve got a BUNCH to share with you! So let’s dig into it! Continue reading 16+ Formative Assessment Tools for #RemoteLearning!