The Ultimate App Smash Lesson

 

Recently, I was fortunate to be a guest on the awesome Google Teacher Tribe Podcast.  Not only are Matt & Kasey rockstars, but their show is my favorite education podcast.  It was an honor and a blast.

It’s a tradition on the show for the guest to create a lesson plan that listeners can use.  I chose to take a few ideas that I’ve posted about here and combine them into the Ultimate App Smash Lesson.  The lesson combines #StopMotionSlides, Screencastify & FlipGrid.  It can be used with any just about any content and is appropriate in most grades, starting in around 3rd grade.

You can find the lesson at bit.ly/ultimateappsmash.  I hope you enjoy it . . . and I’d love to see some of what your kiddos create when you use it!

Screencastify to FlipGrid

This post by Meghan Zigmund calls App Smashing “The art of imaginatively using multiple apps to create an enhanced project.”

Two of my favorite edtech tools right now are Screencastify and FlipGrid.  One missing feature in Screencastify is an easy platform for students seeing each other’s recordings.  One missing feature in FlipGrid is including screen recordings, rather than just webcam recordings.

Enter App Smashing.  On a Chromebook, it’s pretty easy to record in Screencastify and then post in FlipGrid.  Check out how in the GIF below.  After the GIF, check out a list of possible applications of this.  (Did I leave something out? Feel free to share it in the comments or on Twitter!)

Screencastify to FlipGrid Animation

Tons of ideas for how to use this . . .

  • Narrate Google Slides, like the example above.
  • Show how to do something on the computer.
  • Share a piece of writing in Google Docs, like a poem.
  • Share and explain a Scratch project.
  • Show off a #StopMotionSlides video.
  • Have multiple students give feedback on 1 writing project

NOTE: If you’re not on a Chromebook, you’ll likely need to download your video from Screencastify (or Google Drive) before uploading it to FlipGrid.

Trying out FlipGrid

After seeing Amy Roediger‘s post about FlipGrid, I had to try it.

FlipGrid is a platform where (1) teacher poses a prompt or question, (2) students access that “grid” with a code, (3) students record their response, (4) students view each other’s responses and (5) students can comment on or like classmate’s response(s).

Amy’s example of the students showing, describing and explaining Chemistry lab experiments/demonstrations was phenomenal.  On her first attempt out of the gate, she went above and beyond the “record a video response” format.

So, I’m getting in on the action.  At this link, you’ll see a prompt from me.  Hopefully, you’ll also see other professionals’ responses.  And, even more hopefully (if that makes sense), you’ll record you response.  I can’t want to hear what you share!!